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SSI Supplemental Security Income Archives

Supplemental Security Income differs from SSD benefits

When some people in Mississippi think of Social Security, they think of the retirement funds that are taken out of every paycheck. But, when people become disabled, either through injury or illness, and aren't able to work anymore, there is another Social Security program the may apply for altogether -- Social Security Disability. These funds are there for those who qualify and who are short of their retirement age. However, our readers may not know that there is yet another program that is administered by the Social Security Administration -- Supplemental Security Income.

The basic requirements for qualifying for SSI benefits


Mississippi residents who are facing tough times, financially speaking, are usually looking for ways to help lighten the burden of bills and expenses that seem to continue to pile up. For some people, this means taking on a second job or working more overtime hours. However, some of our readers in Mississippi don't have this option. Some are either disabled or have extremely limited means. People who find themselves in this type of situation may be able to qualify for Supplemental Security Income, also known as SSI.

Helping the disabled to claim SSI benefits


The U.S. government provides certain benefits for individuals who are disabled. One of the largest such programs is Supplemental Security Income disability. If your condition qualifies you for the program, if you have worked long enough and paid Social Security taxes, the government may pay you and certain members of your family. However, getting through the hurdles to show that you are eligible for the benefits is not easy. SSI has specific categories of impairment. Various disorders and illnesses are placed in each category. Cardiovascular system impairments category covers heart disease and chronic heart failure. Digestive system impairments include liver disease, hemorrhage and inflammatory bowel disease. Mental disorders like autism, schizophrenia and anxiety disorders are also covered by SSI. Special senses and speech impairments are also covered and may be applied to individuals who are blind, deaf or have speech disorders.

What are the rules for SSI benefits due to blindness?


For those in Mississippi who are who are suffering from full or partial blindness, there are different rules to receiving Supplemental Security Income in comparison to other programs. This must be understood when applying for SSI benefits. Benefits can be paid to people through the Social Security disability or SSI program if they are diagnosed as being blind. For SSI, there is various criteria that must be met to be able to receive benefits.

Working while receiving SSI benefits


As discussed previously on this blog, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a government program that provides low-income individuals who suffer a disability or are of a certain age with a stipend. In order to qualify, individuals must be 65-years-old or older, or suffer a disability or blindness. Though SSI benefits can be extremely helpful in tough times, it may not be enough. But, can an individual work while receiving SSI benefits?

SSI program scrutinized for expansion

Supplemental Security Income, though less well-known than Social Security disability benefits, is an important benefit program aimed at assisting disabled adults and children with “limited income and resources.” Unlike Social Security disability, Supplemental Security Income is not a social insurance program but a welfare program. Given that the program paid out roughly $20 billion over the last two years, it should come as no surprise that it has come under scrutiny.

How is SSI different from SSDI?

While we write frequently about the Social Security disability program on this blog, we do not write as frequently about its sister program, Supplemental Security Income. SSI, as the program is usually abbreviated, is different in nature from the Social Security disability program.

What is SSI, and how does it relate to SSDI?

Our Mississippi readers have all heard a bit about Social Security disability and what it offers to those with serious impairments which prevent them from working. Readers may not know very much about Supplemental Security Income, though, which is another Social Security program also for the benefit of those with disabilities.

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