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What types of burns can you sustain in a car accident?

As a Mississippi driver, no one need tell you that car accidents occur far too frequently. If you find yourself the victim of a fiery car crash, you could not only sustain catastrophic injuries, but you could also have lasting scars once the burns themselves finally heal.

It may surprise you to learn that, as the American Burn Association points out, you can receive the following four types of burns in a car crash:

  1. Thermal burns you receive when one or more parts of your body come into contact with the fire’s flames or with one of your vehicle’s exceedingly hot surfaces
  2. Scald burns you receive when one or more parts of your body come into contact with one of your vehicle’s hot liquids, such as gasoline
  3. Electrical burns you receive when one or more parts of your body come into contact with one of your vehicle’s electrical wires or with a downed power line
  4. Chemical burns you receive when one or more parts of your body come into contact with one of your vehicle’s caustic and/or corrosive fluids, such as antifreeze, steering fluid, etc.

Degrees of burns

Unfortunately, most fiery car crash victims receive serious third- and fourth-degree burns rather than the less serious first- or second-degree burns that most often result from being out in the sun too long in the summer. Both third- and fourth-degree burns can be life-threatening.

In a third-degree burn, not only does your skin get singed or even burned away, but the burn extends down into your nerves, muscles, tendons and the other tissues under your skin. In a fourth-degree burn, the damage extends all the way down into your bones. One of the most frightening things about either a third- or fourth-degree burn is that due to your nerve damage, you may not realize how seriously you have been burned because you cannot feel the pain. This is why you should always seek immediate medical assessment and intervention any time you suffer any kind of a burn in a car crash or other catastrophic event.

This is general educational information and not intended to provide legal advice.

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