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Teen drivers need to be more careful during 100 deadliest days

For every mile traveled, drivers aged 16 to 17 are three times more likely than adult drivers are to be in a fatal crash. Parents in Mississippi should know that the chances of a fatal teen driving crash go up in the time between Memorial Day and Labor Day: the “100 deadliest days” as safety experts call it.

During the 100 deadliest days, there were, from 2008 to 2018, more than 8,300 fatalities stemming from accidents involving a teen driver. Teens are often to blame for the crashes they are in as they tend to be more negligent and reckless than adult drivers.

According to a recent Traffic Safety Culture Index, an annual survey conducted by AAA, 72% of respondents aged 16 to 18 admitted to being an unsafe driver in the past 30 days. Speeding in a residential area (47%), speeding on the highway (40%) and texting (35%) were the most widespread forms of negligence. Thirty-two percent admitted to running a red light while 31% said they drove aggressively.

Every year before the 100 deadliest days, parents need to remind their teens to be safe drivers. They could even set up sessions where they sit beside their teen in the car and coach them on safe driving. AAA recommends at least 50 hours of this.

Even with coaching, though, teens can still decide to be negligent. Whenever this failure to uphold the duty of care to other road users leads to motor vehicle accidents, those who are injured may file a personal injury claim. Mississippi follows a pure comparative negligence, which means that technically, one can be eligible for compensation even if one is 99% at fault. Obviously, any degree of fault is going to make the filing process harder, so victims may want legal representation.

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